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the Top Tourist Destinations in Midi-Pyrénées
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Col du Tourmalet is open !

Come to climb our major asset, our mythic pass : the Tourmalet !!
 

Col du Tourmalet

 
Get on your bikes, the Tourmalet pass is finally open!
 
2115 m, this Pyrenean giant is the highest pass by the Tour de France!
With its two sides: Luz Saint-Sauevur and Sainte Marie de Campan the Tourmalet is the undisputed passage of your cycling holiday.
At the foot of the fabulous and majestic Pic du Midi de Bigorre, live the cycling legend on its epic percentages!
Technical Info: Luz Saint-Sauveur slope: 19 km - 1268 m vertical drop - Average percentage: 6% - Maximum percentage: 9%
Versant Sainte-Marie de Campan: 22.5 km - 1404 m vertical drop - Average percentage: 7.4% - Maximum percentage: 10.2%  
 

HISTORY ...

The first cycling race passing by the Col du Tourmalet mentioned is held on August 18, 1902. It is called "competition bicylette tourism" and is organized by the Touring Club de France. The start and finish of the race are located in Tarbes. The Tourmalet is climbed twice over a distance of 215 km. Jean Fischer passes twice in the lead at the pass. It was not until 1910 that the Tourmalet was climbed for the first time by the Tour de France. Octave Lapize took the lead on July 21, 1910, during the great Bayonne-Luchon stage, 325 km long. On this occasion, he told the organizers this famous phrase: "You are murderers!" Since then, the pass has been climbed many times by the Tour de France and even remains the one most often crossed by this race, all mountains combined. In particular, he arrived in 2010 in the famous Scleck vs Contador battle. On the Tour de France of 1913, Eugene Christophe is overturned by a car in the descent of the pass. His fork is broken. The regulation prohibiting any assistance in the race, it is 14 kilometers on foot, bike on the shoulder to reach Sainte-Marie de Campan. There, in a forge, in the name of the principle of autonomy, Christophe is forced to repair his own fork.